Friday, June 04, 2010

Britain News Page standards slip

The other day I commented on the wording of one of the headlines on the front page of the BBC News Page.  Today I have spotted another one I’d like to pass comment on.

If you navigate to this article, you will see that the headline - “Naoto Kan becomes Japan's new prime minister” – is fine.  Nothing sensational, but at least it’s grammatically correct.

Sadly, the same cannot be said of the link to the article from the main page, which reads “New Japan PM pledges fresh start.”

It’s a subtle thing, but an important one nonetheless.  Maybe I’m showing my age, but I’m a stickler for correct grammar.

If your unable to see what myself is on about, don’t worry about it. Just don’t pretend that your A Grade English Language GCSE is worth anything.

Wednesday, June 02, 2010

Feeling like a Twit

Today I realised the first hand dangers of idle Tweets.  It felt like speaking to the whole world without thinking, and then not being there in person to deal with the aftermath.

No-one actually commented on my Facebook status, but I do apologise if you saw it and deemed it tasteless.

If you’re wondering what I am on about, I was bumbling along this morning, iTunes was open and Eric Clapton was singing.  “I Shot the Sheriff” was the tune, and as I enjoyed the sound and envisaged busting a few moves I tweeted.  JP “shot the sheriff, but did not shoot the deputy” was the gist.

Unfortunately, although iTunes was open, the BBC News page was not.  I have since learned of the awful events in Cumbria today, but it was sometime before I logged in to Facebook and realised what I’d gone and done.

It was, of course, a genuine mistake.  I wasn’t to know.  But it has got me thinking about how badly wrong innocent tweets can go.  Do I continue to tweet about my life?  Does anyone care, anyway?  Can I live without an outlet for my thoughts?

In the meantime, my thoughts and prayers are with those in Cumbria, and my sincere apologies are extended to those of you who thought I was being more tastless than usual.

Citizen Science Saves Birds

So read the BBC Headline for this article.  It’s as if choosing a headline is done by pulling words out of a hat.